Hearing for Florida shooting suspect case canceled

  • The Rally in Tally protesters chant after marching to the Florida Capitol for the Rally in Tally in Tallahassee, Fla., Feb 26, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser) Mark Wallheiser

  • Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting survivor Maddy Wilford, right, wipes a tear as her mom Missy looks on during a press conference at Broward Health North in Deerfield Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 26, 2018. (AP Photo/Terry Renna) TERRY RENNA

  • FILE - In this Feb. 19, 2018 file photo, Nikolas Cruz, accused of murdering 17 people in the Florida high school shooting, appears in court for a status hearing in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Cruz reportedly had a history of shooting small animals. While some animal welfare advocates question the usefulness of animal abuser registries, laws creating them have been passed in a growing number of municipalities in recent years with proponents citing studies linking animal cruelty to crimes ranging from domestic violence to mass shootings. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, Pool, File) Mike Stocker

Associated Press
Tuesday, February 27, 2018

PARKLAND, Fla. — A Tuesday morning hearing in the criminal case against the suspect accused in the Florida high school shooting has been canceled.

Prosecutors are seeking to obtain hair samples, fingerprints, DNA and photographs of Nikolas Cruz, 19. The hearing was removed from the court docket and no explanation was immediately available.

Cruz, who has been charged with 17 counts of murder, was not expected to appear in court because he waived his right to attend the hearing. He is being held without bail at the Broward County Jail.

In a separate court matter, Cruz’s lawyers are seeking to disqualify a judge from presiding over the case. The defense says in court papers that Circuit Court Judge Elizabeth Scherer is biased in favor of prosecutors, threatening Cruz’s right to a fair trial.

Cruz signed an affidavit in a barely legible printed scrawl that resembled the writing of a young child.

As the case moves through the courts, it has fueled a debate over gun control in the halls of the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee, hours from where the shooting took place at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

On Monday, a state Senate committee approved a bill Monday to raise the age for buying a gun from 18 to 21 and imposing a three-day waiting period for all gun purchases. The bill would also allow teachers to carry guns in schools if their school district approves and the teachers undergo law enforcement training and are deputized by the local sheriff’s office.

About 300 gun safety advocates packed the room and dozens pleaded with senators to include an assault weapons ban in the bill. That idea was rejected on a 6-7 vote.

Stoneman Douglas students Katherine Guerra and Bela Urbina, both 15, stood together to argue for a ban on assault-style rifles.

“This weapon has killed so many people. It is a militarized weapon that we don’t need. We don’t need civilians to have it,” Urbina said.

In reference to hunting, Guerra added, “Do you think that your sport is more important than human lives? And if you believe that, you need to reassess yourselves.” The students received thunderous applause.

A similar House bill was going to be considered by a committee Tuesday.

Bused in from around the state, protesters wore orange T-shirts saying #GunReformNow. One held a sign with an image from the movie “The Sixth Sense,” with the words “I SEE DEAD PEOPLE ... THANKS TO THE GOP AND NRA.” Another said “Hey Lawmakers! Take the Pledge. No NRA Money.”

Students are scheduled to return to school Wednesday, for the first time since the Feb. 14 shooting.

The Florida House is expected to subpoena records from Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel and several agencies that interacted with Cruz. Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s office has asked the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to investigate the police response, and the agency confirmed it would begin the probe immediately.

Also Monday, the attorney for the sheriff’s deputy assigned to guard the high school said that his client never entered the building to confront the suspect because he believed the gunfire was coming from outside.

Scot Peterson has been called a coward and worse for failing to stop the massacre. The criticism intensified as President Donald Trump blasted the deputy and other officers who were there, saying they “weren’t exactly Medal of Honor winners.”

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