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Michigan universities vyingfor delay on Nassar-inspired bills

  • Former Michigan State University sports-medicine and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar during his criminal sexual abuse sentencing at Eaton County Circuit Court in Charlotte, Mich., on Jan. 31. Michigan’s 15 public universities on Monday asked the Legislature to delay voting on bills inspired by the Larry Nassar sexual abuse case, expressing concern about measures that would retroactively extend the time victims would have to file lawsuits and remove an immunity defense for governmental agencies. AP File Photo

  • FILE - This Jan. 26 2018, photo show Demonstrators at Michigan State University’s East Lansing, Mich., campus gather to support victims of sex abuse sports doctor Larry Nassar on Jan. 26. Michigan’s 15 public universities on Monday the Legislature to delay voting on bills inspired by the Nassar sexual abuse case, expressing concern about measures that would retroactively extend the time victims would have to file lawsuits and remove an immunity defense for governmental agencies. AP File Photo

  • FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2006, file photo, mencement at the Convocation Center in Ypsilanti, Mich., on Dec. 17, 2006. Michigan’s 15 public universities on Monday, March 12, 2018, asked the Legislature to delay voting on bills inspired by the Larry Nassar sexual abuse case, expressing concern about measures that would retroactively extend the time victims would have to file lawsuits and remove an immunity defense for governmental agencies. AP File Photo



Associated Press
Tuesday, March 13, 2018

LANSING, Mich. — Michigan’s 15 public universities on Monday asked the Legislature to delay voting on bills inspired by the Larry Nassar sexual abuse case, expressing concern about measures that would retroactively extend the time victims would have to file lawsuits and remove an immunity defense for governmental agencies.

The Senate is posed to vote this week on the legislation backed by victims of the imprisoned former doctor at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics.

In a letter to lawmakers and Gov. Rick Snyder, the Michigan Association of State Universities said several bills would have a “profound impact.” The group commissioned an analysis from the Dykema law firm warning that the proposals would encourage the filing of a “significant number” of lawsuits against universities, churches, schools, governments, and community and civic organizations — exposing them financially, increasing the cost of insurance and having a negative impact on government credit ratings.

“We ask that decisions on these bills be delayed to allow for more analysis and discussion to ascertain their full impact,” wrote Daniel Hurley, CEO of the group that advocates for the state’s universities.

People sexually abused as children in Michigan generally have until their 19th birthdays to sue. Under the legislation , which is expected to be revised before the Senate votes, those abused as children in 1993 or later could sue until their 48th birthdays while those assaulted in adulthood would have 30 years to file a claim from the time of the abuse.


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