There’s no place like home... or RCS, as ‘Wizard of Oz’ hits the stage

  • The Royalston Community School’s Drama Club took a moment last week for a group picture at their final dress rehearsal of The Wizard of Oz. The production, which took place in the cafetorium on Thursday evening was underwritten by a generous grant from the Royalston Academy, and supported by school administration, faculty, staff, and parents. Mary C. Barclay

  • The Royalston Community School’s Drama Club took a moment last week for a group picture at their final dress rehearsal of The Wizard of Oz. The production, which took place in the cafetorium on Thursday evening was underwritten by a generous grant from the Royalston Academy, and supported by school administration, faculty, staff, and parents. —Mary C. Barclay

  • The Scarecrow, Lion, Tinman, Dorothy, and Toto are off to see The Wizard. The Scarecrow is looking for a brain, the Lion is in search of courage, the Tinman wants a heart, and Dorothy and Toto are hoping to make it back home to Kansas. The Wizard of Oz was presented by the Royalston Community School Drama Club Thursday, before a full house in the cafetorium.  —Mary C. Barclay

  • The Scarecrow, Lion, Tinman, Dorothy, and Toto are off to see The Wizard. The Scarecrow is looking for a brain, the Lion is in search of courage, the Tinman wants a heart, and Dorothy and Toto are hoping to make it back home to Kansas. The Wizard of Oz was presented by the Royalston Community School Drama Club Thursday, before a full house in the cafetorium.  —Mary C. Barclay

  • After a long and eventful journey, (l-r) the Scarecrow, Dorothy, the Lion, the Tinman and Dorothy’s dog, Toto are finally granted an audience with the omnipotent Wizard of Oz, who looks rather like sixth grade teacher Brian Snell at the Royalston Community School. —Mary C. Barclay

  • Dorothy removes the ruby red slippers off of the Wicked Witch of the West, who has had a house land on top of her, as Glinda the Good Witch, and Munchkins Burly, Curly and Joe look on. The scene was from the Royalston Community School Drama Club’s recent production of the Wizard of Oz. —Mary C. Barclay

  • Dorothy fends off the Wicked Witch of the West by dousing her with water, which causes the Witch to shriek, “I’m melting!” The memorable scene was part of The Wizard of Oz, presented last week by the Royalston Community School Drama Club. The production was underwritten by a generous grant from the Royalston Academy. —Mary C. Barclay

For the Athol Daily News
Published: 4/3/2019 1:55:36 PM

ROYALSTON — The Royalston Community School Drama Club recently presented an adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s book, “The Wizard of Oz” in the cafetorium, before a full house. The ambitious undertaking was well received by the audience at the final performance last Thursday evening, and involved more than two dozen students from grades three through six.

Colorful costumes and creative scenery enhanced the outstanding performances of the young thespians. The hour-long production respected the original storyline, and managed to artfully weave in both the familiar characters and many of the happenings found in the book.

The story opened with Auntie Em, played by Aubrie Hautanen, and Uncle Henry, played by Chance Parsons, trying to get Dorothy, played by Cassidy Cochran and Gabriella Linsky, and Dorothy’s little dog Toto, played by JuliAnne LeRay and Lillie McGivern, into the storm cellar ahead of the impending tornado.

Toto took off, with Dorothy in hot pursuit. Dorothy was knocked unconscious by flying debris and when she awoke, it was in an unfamiliar place, filled with unusual beings like Munchkins Burly, Curly, and Joe, played by Ryleigh Dunn, Mallory Germain, and Valerie Lafountain, respectively.

Most of the hallmark scenes were acted out, but in a far less frightening way than the 1939 classic movie that scared (and continues to scare) many a child. The twister, the house falling on the Wicked Witch, played by Audrina Vincent, Glinda the Good Witch, played by Ava Basso, the sparkly ruby red slippers, and the hot air balloon ride were all incorporated into the production.

As Dorothy and Toto embarked on their eventful journey to find the Wizard of Oz, the one being who could help the pair find their way back to Kansas, they were joined the brainless scarecrow, played by Max Parsons and Hailey Cummings; the heartless Tinman, played by Allison Hadmack; and the scared-y cat lion, played by Catarina Chapman.

All manner of obstacles were found along the way, including trees named Woody and Shady, played by Jason LaPointe and Andrew LaPointe, both of whom pelted the group with apples. They wandered into a field of intoxicating flowers, which happened to be every color of the rainbow.

The full spectrum of the rainbow was comprised of Red, Sarah Linskey; Orange, Hannah Case; Yellow Leah Lacasse; Green, Evelyn Robinson; Blue, Maddison Blake; and Purple, Ellie Killay-Rostock. They were costumed in appropriate colors, sporting flowers on springy antennae, reminiscent of The Lollipop Kids in the original production.

Despite the challenges, the new-found friends took the advice to “Follow the Yellow Brick Road,” ultimately making it to the Wizard’s gate. They were granted an audience with Wizard, ingeniously depicted as a floating head (that of sixth grade teacher Brian Snell, no less) who sends the group on a dangerous mission.

As the group attempted to accomplish their mission, they dealt with flying monkeys Chimp, Scamp, and Rascal, played by Natalie Pina, Ryder Barilone, and Claire Campbell; the Wicked Witch attempting to steal the Ruby Red Slippers; and the Scarecrow being set afire.

Dorothy was dismayed when she finally made it past the Gatekeeper, played by Aubrielle Brockney, to meet the Wizard of Oz, played by Chance Parsons, only to discover the Wizard was just an ordinary man. The wise Wizard gave each of Dorothy’s friends a tangible item, but each item proved they already had within themselves the characteristics they so badly wanted.

The production was underwritten by a generous grant from The Royalston Academy, and presented through an arrangement with ArtReach Children’s Theatre Plays. The script was from Adapted for Young Performers by Kathryn Schultz Miller, a founding member of ArtReach.

Fifth grade teacher Marisa Coviello and school nurse Sheila Hall co-directed the production, which involved after school practices twice weekly for five weeks, and practices every day after school the week of the performance.

The co-directors expressed their sincere appreciation and thanks to Librarian Theresa Quinn for all of her assistance, to Principal Beth Craven and Secretary Marie Lajoie for their support of the Drama Club, and to all of the RCS staff, and many parents for their participation in the production.


E-Edition & Local Ads


Weather



athol forecast

Most Popular


Athol among towns to receive watershed management funds  

Athol Police Log: Aug. 15

LVOA board members announced

Social Media




Athol Daily News

PO Box 1000
225 Exchange Street
Athol, MA 01331
(978) 249-3535

 

Copyright © 2019 by Newspapers of Massachusetts, Inc.